Distributors sold out, restaurants without option: crece la

Every day, the distributor Adriano da Costa sells from his house before the night, takes the bus to Avenida Paulista, the heart of the city of San Pablo, and takes the electric bike from the iFood application at the last minute of the morning.

“Delivery service between 11:00 and 11:30”, says the vecino of the Vila Nova Jaraguá housing complex, in the western region of the city.
iFood allows you to rent bicycles up to four hours, at a weekly cost of 24 reais (approx. 5 dollars) which allows up to daily renters.

“Then I use it for four hours, I return it and take it back later, at the time of the scene, to use it for another four hours.”

During the afternoon break, Adriano rents bicycles offered by Banco Itaú to continue sharing. These vehicles are not electric, so the journey becomes heavier.

There is an average of ten hours of daily work, which, added to the time of travel, takes place all day outside the house. When you return, you pass from the media and it is exhausted.

“I can take me the day when I want. I can arrest the application when I want. But I end up working from moon to Sunday, by necessity. Because I have to pay my child’s alimony, I have expenses,” he exemplifies.

For approximately one year and a half, Adriano receives an average of 2,800 monthly reais (approximately 560 dollars) of the application, and pays transportation and food costs throughout the day.

Even though there are divergent decisions, the Brazilian Court does not recognize a labor relationship between agents and applications.

The lack of specific legislation in the country generates a legal instability and sometimes they are treated as autonomous, sometimes as independent and more rarely as formal workers, according to the labor law, known as CLT (Consolidación de las Leyes de Trabajo)

Application distributors move in several Brazilian cities / Jaqueline Deister

Adriano’s main interests refer to the bicycle mileage limit and the high rates charged by the application.

“In some cases, there is a delivery at 5 km, 7 km and we must pedal under the blazing sun. These distances should be valid only for motorbikes. Our limit should be 4 km”, he says.

“Y, sometimes, they pay us 7 reais (about 1.4 dollars) for 6 km. It’s not worth it. If you just spend 30 minutes waiting for the order to be listed at the restaurant, take an hour to make a delivery” .

Questionnaire about the amount paid for delivery and the most frequent between the dealers.

João Francisco* works 11 hours a day in Belo Horizonte (in Minas Gerais) and I suggest that in the hub adjustments are proportional to the rise of fuel prices in the country.

“Move me, I had to go live in a more crippled barrio, because I couldn’t pay the rent. Monday, I get the bills and I see what I pay to work. I don’t have anything,” he says.

“As long as I have the opportunity of a work with a formal contract, in any area, I take it. But now, if I’m laughing or exclude myself from the platform, the next day I’ll be on the calle asking for help”, completes the dealer, whoever It works for three different applications and opted not to reveal its name to avoid reprisals.

In addition to unemployment, the loss of purchasing power of those left in the formal labor market also causes many workers, even dissatisfied with the tariffs, to continue with the applications.

Adriano da Costa says that he worked for 5 years and a half as a lift operator at Grupo Pão de Açúcar, one of the biggest supermarket chains in Brazil, and his monthly salary was always lower than what he currently charges with iFood.

¿Malo for everyone?

The dissatisfaction of the distributors with the conditions offered by the platforms has been growing in Brazil. Since 2020, workers from various cities have protested for improvements in the relationship and rights ensured.

The most known demonstration was the “Breque dos Apps” (Frenada de las Apps) in July of the past year, a national church with great access to San Pablo and other capitals.

“He has been the witness of several demonstrations. And they didn’t participate only because on that day they needed to earn money, because they didn’t. So these people want to improve, but in the Huelga Harán”, analyzes Adriano, who has already participated in acts against companies from the sector so that it is not excluded from the platform.

João Francisco says that he intends to “near close” to the protests, so that nadie sees him as a participant and that he is in danger of his work.

Your concern makes sense. One of the organizers of the national huelga of 2020, the distributor Paulo Lima, known as Galo, was immediately expelled from the main applications.

While the distributors face exhausting journeys to pay the bills, on the other side of the display the situation is also uncomfortable.

According to the information compiled by Brazil in fact, the tariffs charged to the restaurants for the applications reach el 30% for delivery in
UberEats.

“If we could choose, we would return to how it was before, without the applications”, says Luiz Fernando*, owner of a pizzeria in Porto Alegre, in Río Grande del Sur.

“But today, a pizzeria like ours, which needs a large volume of deliveries to survive, can’t stop by iFood, UberEats, bells of competence go above you”.

Entrepreneurs also prefer not to identify themselves so as not to “have problems” with application companies.


Workers demand adjustment of the rate per shipment, among other rights / Photo: Roberto Parizotti/Public Photos

Luiz Fernando recalls that his pizzeria was one of the last of the city to surrender to digital delivery platforms.

“There was a moment, in the middle of the pandemic, that we couldn’t do more. We saw the vecino, which always had fewer customers, making twice as many deliveries than ours, because it was registered in the application. , explains.

Today, the distributor who worked exclusively for Luiz Fernando’s pizzeria makes deliveries by application in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre.

“These companies end up giving up a good part of the value of the pizza, but there is no way to avoid it: if you don’t enter the application, you don’t get it, you don’t get it. The number of orders per night should be reduced”, says the company.

Alternatives

According to estimates by the National Association of Restaurants, the average share of home delivery in total restaurant tickets jumped from 11% to 21% between the start of the pandemic and the December 2020.

Paulo César da Motta is one of the owners of the Empório do Aroma cafe and restaurant, in the center of Curitiba, Paraná. The establishment opened a week before the first lockdown in the city, in March 2020.

“We studied the feasibility of adding to the delivery applications. However, with the proposals we have, the rates, and all the investment that we would have to do with the packaging, for example, we understood that it would not be advantageous”, he says.

Another factor that makes this selection unfeasible is that the value of the deliveries alone adds to the account of the owners after 30 days.

Today, Emporium of Aroma is one of the few cafes in the region that survives without being registered in the applications.

“Making the calculations with the prices that charge and the percentage that we should pay for the application, we saw that it was not worth the penalty”, he says.
While chatting with other businessmen of the rubro, Paulo César understood that joining the application would generate a sudden increase in customers, but it would not bring benefits in a wide area.

“What we have is saying that embedding in the application always generates a sales boom, where it is an illusion. You are well positioned, think that it will be permanent and you will have a larger stock of purchases. el tuyo fall hidden”, says the entrepreneur.

Another reason for not opting for the platforms is the growing precariousness of the work of the distributors.

“All work deserves a decent remuneration. When we saw that the payer received 3 or 4 reales (less than 1 dollar) for a distance of more than 5 km, we considered that, by entering a delivery application, we would be contributing to the exploitation of the work —y with a packaging market with prices disconnected from reality”, he completes.

The applications in the work with a fixed value by distance or by delivery. According to iFood, “per kilometer traveled over the total distance, a minimum of 1 real (US$0.2) is paid at the distributor. In addition, there is an additional fee if you are located in the restaurant. In most cities, this rate is available it aggregates from los 5 km away”.

Today, Paulo César and his partner Vladimir carry out deliveries in their car, but at restricted times, so as not to compromise the face-to-face service and the quality of the product.

Emporium of Aroma is an exception in the biggest cities of the country. The delivery-by-application model is more popular in the pandemic and the protests of the distributors have been effective in some specific cases.

“The presión is bearing fruit,” I told Brasil de Fato the motorcycle dealer Altemício Nascimento, who followed the iFood negotiations with a group of dealers who declared themselves in the village of São José dos Campos (San Pablo state) en septiembre .

In addition to the adjustment in the amount paid per kilometer or per delivery, the demand for delivery includes the end of unauthorized blocks, the requirement of a confirmation code on deliveries and better resting places.

In San José, workers received three simultaneous requests for the application.

“On the 28th, they promised to change the rates and settle the triple orders. Because today, three orders are placed together. Sea, the persona of free orders for iFood. There is no way,” explained Altemício.

In the city, 100 km from San Pablo, there is a restaurant and the support of bars and restaurants, which understand the reasons. At the same time, the agents showed themselves to be open to dialogue and volunteered to work during the six days, so as not to harm the entrepreneurs.

The workers announced that they will stop again if iFood does not fulfill its promises.

Luiz Fernando, Pizzeria Dueño in Porto Alegre, says that solo conditions will improve if distributors and small entrepreneurs unite and claim their rights.

“It’s a pity that it’s difficult to build this idea. We’re in the same rough boat, in the predicament of everyday life, we even discuss with them, we fight, because some dealers put pressure on us for the order to salt quickly,” he says.

“It would be correct to align ourselves with them and look for a way to ask for better conditions for everyone. What hay today is not good for nadie”, he concludes.

the other side

Brasil de Fato presented the criticisms of the mentioned companies and asked what they are and how to use the criteria to define the tariffs charged to the restaurants and associated distributors.

UberEats informed that the answer would be in charge of the Brazilian Association of Mobility and Technology (Amobitec), which groups together new applications in the sector.

Here is the full note sent by Amobitec:

“The companies associated with Amobitec are open to dialogue and work to help the conductors and distributors associated to generate income, including the carrying out of revisions and adjustments in several cities in the country.

Regarding the values ​​per delivery, the member companies of Amobitec have their own policies on this topic, although, in general terms, the value of each share takes into account a series of factors, such as the total distance, the time necessary for them deliveries and demand for deliveries at a specific time and place.

Among the measures adopted by the companies to help their partners to reduce expenses are those made with gas stations networks that offer discounts, in addition to alliances with companies to offer special prices in supplies, accessories and maintenance”.

* João Francisco and Luiz Fernando are fictitious names, and that the worker and the entrepreneur interviewed in the project to identify themselves.

Edition: Anelize Moreira

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